When Pride and Yom Kippur Collide

The unfortunate coincidence of NC Pride and Yom Kippur has elicited many reactions. Here’s mine…

I know you’ve received a good deal of communication already regarding the scheduling conflict that will keep the Jewish community from taking part in NC Pride this year. I’m writing to share my own sense of disappointment, and that of many within Judea Reform Congregation, at being excluded due to this conflict. As a religious community with longstanding and deeply-held commitments to LGBTQ justice, taking part in the parade is a chance to take the values we preach and teach out into the world.

For many years my synagogue did not take part in the parade due to the conflict with our sabbath. In 2015, we changed the policy that kept us from taking part in social justice events on Saturdays. We’ve participated as a synagogue for the past two years, and were looking forward to doing so again this year. Months ago we blocked off September 23 on our planning calendars (we’d assumed it was going to be held on the fourth Saturday, and failed to consider that it might be scheduled for the last), so that nothing we planned would conflict with Pride. You can imagine our surprise our surprise and disappointment when the date was published on the ncpride.org website.

As you know, and have acknowledged, this scheduling conflict is painful to Queer Jews and their allies. As an often-marginalized minority community in the South, most Jews are used to schedules being made by the dominant culture with scant concern for our participation. It’s doubly painful that the latest oversight came from the LGBTQ community, also so frequently marginalized. Adding to the pain is the particular moment in which this oversight occurred, a time of rising bias against the LGBTQ community and the Jewish community alike. Recent events have led to even more tension between the two communities (the Chicago Dyke March being the most obvious example).

I hasten to add that I assume no ill-will on your part, or anyone’s at NC Pride; I only mention all of this to provide some context for what I know has been an avalanche of reaction, much of it very emotional.

From all that I’ve heard, there is no way for a change to be made to this year’s schedule. I am hoping against hope for a miracle. Failing that, I hope that you’ll make a note to avoid September 30, 2028 (Yom Kippur), and September 30, 2030 (Rosh Hashanah), so that we can all stand together, in unity and with pride.

Sincerely,
Rabbi Larry Bach

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>